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God Songs: book review

July 16, 2007 — 5 Comments

God Songs: 4 out of 4 stars
Paul Baloche, Jimmy & Carol Owens

Length: 304 pages
Size: 6 1/2 x 9 inches
Format: Softcover
Available Date: November 2004
Published By: Lead Worship
ISBN: 1-933150-033AC

I am a huge fan of Paul Baloche. You can almost say that I seek to be just like him. His heart for worship is unparalleled and his song writing is fantastic. So when I found out he had a book available with Jimmy and Carol Owens (pioneers of Christian music and writers of antshillvania) I had to buy it.

What I got was a manual for not just worship writing but for songwwriting in general. It is full of information to help take a writers songs to a whole new level and goes through every process involved. From prayer and personal worship to thoughts, ideas and inspiration to words, rhyme, and structure to music, theory, and creativity.

I was blown away by how much they cover in this book and it has taught me to think differently about my songwriting.

This is a must read for any body in worship or writing worship.

Communion Song

June 21, 2007 — 8 Comments

Communion Song – written by: Joel Klampert

copyright 2004 Joel Klampert
Creative Commons License

This
work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

A few weeks ago I posted a setlist with a processional of Here is our King that went right into All Hail The Power.
It was all done in the key of E.

Here is how we did it.

25,000 hits

June 11, 2007 — 8 Comments

WHAT A GREAT BIRTHDAY PRESENT. 25,000 hits…thanks everybody. I have done some nerd calculations and I should hit 50,000 by Dec. Considering the fact I want to hit it sooner expect a contest soon.

Not too bad on Technorati either…Getting there.lol

CECWorship (Worship Resources)

http://cecworship.wordpress.com

 CECWorship (Worship Resources) thumbnail

Authority: 30

Rank: 176,288

Thanks again everybody. I hope and pray this site is helping people better serve Christ and the Church. God Bless

About 3 weeks ago My dad who is the pastor of our church came asked me a question.

“What makes modern music Modern”

My answer was can’t you tell the difference? We both agreed we could but it really didn’t make much sense what made a song sound like 2007. Look at whats out there right now. Christina Aguilera has a CD out right now which is pretty much all 1920’s sounding music. It seems what makes something  so called modern is in the production of the music. So what makes the worship music Modern or not modern?

An interesting post was done on the song Everlasting God, by Brenton Brown, on both my blog and on Ragamuffin Soul. Los over there said the song wasn’t very 2007 and wondered how he could fix that. I wrote a post on it myself and agreed but wrote that as worship leaders we need to play stuff we might not enjoy or even like for the sake of the worship of the congregation.
Los decided to play it and it has since grown on him and they have done it a bunch of times in church now. The congregation loves it. His church is a very “hip” church. So why do they love the song,  a song that no matter how you play it (even his way)  does not sound like it was written after the year 2000?

I thought about this a whole bunch. I realized that as musicians we are looking for modern worship. Music that gets our guitars crankin’ and amps to 11. This is ok but also as musicians we get bored quick while the congregation doesn’t.  As worship leaders we shouldn’t think in the same way. We should be looking for music that is relevant.  This is my new buzz word. I want relevant worship not modern worship. I love crankin guitars but that isn’t what gets people to worship. relevance does. The songs need to be relevant in sound, emotion, lyrics, and spirit to the culture in our towns and congregations. My worship team practiced there is no one like you by crowder. Killer song. Modern through and through. It’s a great song, but we aren’t doing it in church because it isn’t relevant to our church. We do other so called modern songs that are fast and crankin’ but they are relevant.

I urge the worship leaders who read this to take a good look at their catalog of music. Take stock in what is relevant and what is just done because it is cool or modern. There is a time for most styles and lyrics of worship, but understanding what is relevant to your congregation and what can help bring them into the throneroom is key.